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Rheumatoid Arthritis: Did You See This Article Part 2?

Rheumatoid Arthritis: Did You See This Article Part 2?

Mood Changes
RA is tied to depression, anxiety, and other mood problems. That’s because the disease causes pain, fatigue, and stiffness that make it harder to do the things you enjoy. Depression and anxiety could also come from inflammation
Some people with RA get fibromyalgia. This illness causes muscle pain and often leads to depression and anxiety. Stress makes all of your symptoms worse
If your mood changes seem to take over your life, talk to your doctor. Depression and anxiety can become… read more

A MyLupusTeam Member said:

Those with Raynaud’s disease have different sized capillaries than “normals”. Raynaud’s capillaries are 5-8 microns internal diameter. “Normals” have internal capillary diameters of 8-15 microns. Red blood cells are standard 7 microns in diameter.
While it is relatively easy to detect Raynaud’s capillaries in periphery, be forewarned, capillary beds throughout all organs of the body, be they Raynaud’s or normals have the same internal diameters.
Temperature can effect capillary internal diameter. Cold causes capillaries to constrict to smallest size, while heat causes caillaries to dilate to largest size. Therefore, it is imperative for people with Raynaud’s disease to keep entire body warm, core included, not just periphery. And if one can increase circulation of heated blood throughout the body, as well as superficial methods to raise peripheral temps, then blood vessels can be heated from both inside and out.

posted 7 months ago
A MyLupusTeam Member said:

Shosta, I never said autoimmune was easy to diagnose. Physicians have their work cut out for them, because of waxing and waning signs & symptoms for a multitude of overlapping diseases. If you have one autoimmine disease, likely you will have others.

posted 7 months ago
A MyLupusTeam Member said:

The article is attributing wuite a few signs & symptoms to RA (rheumatoid arthritis), when they could just as easily be attributed to systrmic lupus🫐

posted 7 months ago
A MyLupusTeam Member said:

@A MyLupusTeam Member
I recommend that you get on the internet and start researching Rheumatologist in your area. If possible, try and find out where they went to school, where they did their internship, what other medical degrees they may have, how long they have been practicing medicine. Have they ever been bought up to the medical board for problems? Look to see what their patients have said about them. See if any other doctor has recommended them to their patience.
I usually make an appointment with my doctor and dentist to just talk with them and ask questions that concern me before I become a patient of theirs. It does cost money, but it has always been well worth it to me.
My dentist has recently retired, but he does sometime come into the practice. My husband still goes to the dental clinic he owns. My husband was in for a teeth cleaning, he had dropped by the clinic for something, he was told my husband was there and we saw him for probably 30 years. The dentist told my husband that he had never met a person like me. My husband started laughing because he's been married to me 38 years. He told my husband I was the first person that had ever interviewed him before he could see my mouth. He said he was really happy that I was a patient of his because I brought him more business than any patient he had ever had.
It sounds like you have been doing a lot of research, if you are not happy with your current doctor, start researching doctors in your area. I think you want specific answers, I don't know at this time if there are always answers to all the autoimmune diseases. I read and do research the diseases that I have been told I have. I have found if you are diagnosed with an autoimmune disease, you probably have more than one. I am a lay person, but I have two friends that are medical doctors in other states that I can bounce question off. I am not knowledgeable about medicine. I am trying to learn as much as I can. I have almost a dozen kindle fires; I buy a lot of books off Amazon. One of my kindles has all the books that I have on Lupus and other autoimmune diseases I have. I don't always understand what I am reading, but the kindle will explain a lot in laymen terms if you click the word, you can mark and highlight things too.
I have another kindle that I buy books about dog health and diseases and do a lot of research.
My Rheumatologist, my Primary Care Doctor and my dog's Veterinarian laugh at me when I come in with the kindle. I also write questions down in it and write down what they say.
I hope you find what you are looking for, sometimes it's hard, takes a while and then you still don't have an answer.

posted 7 months ago
A MyLupusTeam Member said:

@A MyLupusTeam Member, i def know they come in pairs. That much i do know by reasearing this thing. And you got that right, tbey def got their work cut out but, i havent found one im to found of yet 🙋🏼‍♀️🤫😂

posted 7 months ago
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