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Can Diet Help Ease Your Lupus Symptoms?

Posted on May 21, 2021
Medically reviewed by
Ariel D. Teitel, M.D., M.B.A.
Article written by
Torrey Kim

Download the FULL recipe from this video here.

Lupus causes inflammation, and people living with this condition often deal with resulting symptoms such as pain, stiffness, and fatigue. In addition to the treatments your health care team recommends, you may also be interested in determining whether changing your diet might reduce your symptoms.

No single specific diet is recommended for people with lupus. However, many people who live with the condition say they find that certain foods can trigger symptoms, while avoiding specific ingredients can assist in keeping symptoms at bay.

One MyLupusTeam member wrote, “I have found that with lupus, you have to become a scientist. Test foods and keep a journal of the effects.” Another said, “I don’t feel that good when I eat processed foods — it gives me brain fog — but when I eat natural foods like fruits and veggies, I instantly feel better.”

The Benefits of Keeping a Trigger Diary

One way to evaluate which foods or other triggers may cause symptoms is to keep a diary that includes a list of what you consume, as well as other changes you make to your lifestyle. Then you can go back and track what may have helped ease your symptoms and what might have exacerbated them.

“Have your trigger template written down,” advised Emily Johnson, who lives with seronegative arthritis and operates the website Arthritis Foodie. “I know it's time-consuming, but it's self-care. Write down what you’re eating every day, and notice your symptoms. That really helped me. I did that for a year while I was experimenting with food and seeing what helped and what didn't.”

Johnson recommended logging your food intake and other lifestyle changes at the end of each day and then checking back the next day to record any changes in symptoms. You can then go back and evaluate what seems to have helped, what hurt, and what you may want to adjust going forward.

Johnson stressed that she continues to take medication for her arthritis, but that making dishes that use anti-inflammatory ingredients rich in antioxidants has helped her reduce symptoms. “All the things you can do naturally alongside your medication to feel better in your body and your health are important,” she said. This includes consuming a healthy diet while you follow your doctor’s treatment plan.

Stick To Your Eating Plan

There are hundreds of different diets you might consider as you review the foods that trigger your symptoms. Keep in mind that the eating plan you’re most likely to stick with is the one that will work best for you. Don’t choose a diet so extreme you know you won’t adhere to it in the long run. If you change your eating habits, eliminate those ingredients that trigger flare-ups, and stick with the plan so you can remain flare-free.

Johnson offered the following tips to help you adhere to the meal plan that works best for you, whether you’re at home or away:

  • Keep a steady supply of pantry staples on hand that you know you’ll need to support your eating plan.
  • Make large batches of the meals you find most helpful, and store them well so you can dole out servings throughout the week.
  • Freeze prechopped ingredients or even prepared meals, so when you’re having a bad day you can still eat well.
  • When preparing food, sit down to chop, stir, or perform other tasks so your legs and lower back don’t get achy.
  • Make sure your cooking tools — such as peelers, knives, and spoons — are comfortable to hold and lightweight, so you don’t negatively impact your hand or wrist joints.
  • To save money on healthy ingredients, buy dry goods (such as brown rice and quinoa) in bulk. Then the only things you have to buy each week are your fresh ingredients, like leafy greens.
  • Surround yourself with supportive people who understand that you’re trying to avoid certain triggers.
  • Go easy on yourself if you have a tough day or when you fall off of your diet plan.

In addition, Johnson said, don’t forget to plan for snacks and breakfast — two areas that people may overlook when meal-planning. “Something that I do for breakfast is overnight oats,” she said. “I prep that the night before — it’s almond milk or oat milk, whatever milk you like, oats, a bit of honey, chia seeds, and maybe some cocoa powder if you want a chocolate version. I put those in jars, stick them in the fridge, and then in the morning I can just grab it and top it with dried fruits or banana, and then that's breakfast done.”

Remember to talk to your doctor before pursuing any special diets or changes to your eating routine.

Talk With Others Who Understand

On MyLupusTeam, more than 191,000 members come together to ask questions, give advice, and share their stories with others who understand life with lupus.

Are you living with lupus? Have you found that certain foods trigger your symptoms? Share your experience in the comments below, or start a conversation by posting on your Activities page.

Ariel D. Teitel, M.D., M.B.A. is the clinical associate professor of medicine at the NYU Langone Medical Center in New York. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Learn more about him here.
Torrey Kim is the managing editor at MyHealthTeams and has over a decade of experience writing about medical conditions. Learn more about her here.

A MyLupusTeam Member said:

Autoimmune diseases are a mystery to all. After 5 years of near perfect remission, they can break off the chain and devastate. Panic attacks and depression are collateral damage to an ugly disease.

posted 2 days ago

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