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5 Diet Tips for People With Lupus

Updated on August 25, 2022
Medically reviewed by
Ariel D. Teitel, M.D., M.B.A.

Doctors don’t know exactly what causes lupus. This condition can cause inflammation and pain in the body, affecting the joints, skin, kidneys, brain, heart, and lungs. The most common symptoms of lupus include extreme fatigue, headaches, muscle pain, joint pain, and anemia (low numbers of red blood cells or hemoglobin).

Although there is currently no cure for lupus and there is no specific “lupus diet,” there are treatments that may help control or lessen symptoms. If you’re wondering whether you should consider looking into any dietary changes to help manage your lupus, check out these five tips.

1. Consider Eating Anti-Inflammatory Foods

Individuals with lupus are often advised to follow an anti-inflammatory diet to help manage symptoms. This way of eating generally applies to a Mediterranean diet — a diet rich in whole grains, nuts, seeds, lean protein, fruit, and vegetables. General guidelines include choosing healthy fish at least twice weekly. Choose adequate fiber from whole grains, nuts, seeds, and vegetables. Eat healthy fats (especially omega-3 fatty acids) and drink water as your main beverage. Red meat is limited to a few times per month, and regular physical activity is also encouraged.

Omega-3 fatty acids are a key component in the Mediterranean diet and can help prevent inflammation. Dietary sources of omega-3 fatty acids include chia seeds, flaxseeds, walnuts, soybeans, olive oil, flaxseed oil, salmon, tuna, sardines, mackerel, herring, and more.

Fiber from whole grains, beans, legumes, nuts, seeds, fresh fruits, and veggies has been shown to decrease inflammation. Berries tend to have the highest fiber content of fruit and are also a rich source of antioxidants, making them a wonderful choice for an anti-inflammatory diet. Women should consume 25 grams of fiber or more per day, and men should consume 38 grams of fiber or more per day. This should be matched with at least 64 fluid ounces of water per day to properly digest fiber and minimize any nutrient malabsorption.

2. Know the Anti-Inflammatory Ingredients

Inflammation is a comprehensive issue, and food is only one aspect of keeping it in check. Managing your stress and getting adequate sleep help to decrease inflammation in the body. Regular, moderate physical activity is also important.

Foods and supplements are sometimes marketed as anti-inflammatory with little or no scientific research. To date, no dietary supplements are recommended for individuals with lupus to help decrease inflammation. There are, however, some well-researched foods that may reduce inflammation.

Vitamin C, vitamin E, vitamin A, and selenium have high antioxidant properties and may be beneficial in fighting inflammation. Top food sources for these vitamins include sweet potatoes, carrots, red peppers, citrus fruits, nuts, and eggs.

Curcumin, a chemical compound found in the spice turmeric, has been proved to decrease inflammation in the body. Current recommendations are 1/2 teaspoon to 1 1/2 teaspoons (or 1 to 3 grams) of turmeric per day. Turmeric can be added as a seasoning to soups, stews, stir-fries, vegetables, chicken, fish, and more. Choose the spice turmeric, added to foods, over taking turmeric packaged into capsules and sold as dietary supplements.

3. Avoid Garlic, Alfalfa Sprouts, and More

Although some foods have been shown to lower levels of inflammation in the body, there is evidence that other foods may worsen inflammation and potentially make lupus symptoms flare in some people.

Alfalfa sprouts have been found to increase inflammation in individuals with lupus due to the amino acid L-canavanine. Alfalfa sprouts should be avoided by all individuals with lupus.

There are substances in garlic (allicin, ajoene, and thiosulfinates) that boost your immune system, which is why garlic is often used to suppress colds or prevent cancer. For individuals with an autoimmune condition like lupus, the immune enhancement of garlic is counterproductive because the immune system is already overactive. Individuals with lupus should avoid adding garlic to meals. However, a small amount of garlic is likely not harmful.

Foods that are proven to increase inflammation include processed foods and fast food, sugar, alcohol, saturated fat, and trans fats. Alcohol intake should be kept to a minimum, as it may also interfere with prescribed medications related to lupus.

There is no scientific evidence suggesting that individuals with lupus should avoid red meat, but red meat may contribute to inflammation. A plant-based diet is not necessarily recommended but is often richer in fiber, vitamins, and minerals that may relieve symptoms.

Some people believe that nightshade vegetables (white potatoes, tomatoes, eggplant, bell peppers) and gluten may lead to inflammation. To date, there is no scientific evidence to support these claims. Individuals with a diagnosis of celiac disease should avoid gluten. Those with food allergies should avoid foods that trigger a reaction.

4. Consider a Few Key Nutrition Tips for Overall Health

Lupus affects the whole body and can lead to many health complications, but keeping nutrition in mind can help prevent these from getting worse. The nutrition recommendations for living with lupus can support overall health and quality of life.

Kidney Disease

Lupus nephritis is a type of kidney disease caused by systemic lupus erythematosus. Your kidneys are important organs that filter extra water and waste out of your bloodstream. They maintain a proper balance of calcium, phosphorus, sodium, and potassium. Your kidneys are also important in regulating blood pressure and promoting bone health. If you experience lupus nephritis or kidney disease, you may have to monitor what you eat. Moderate protein intake can help support renal function in individuals with lupus (0.6 grams per kilogram of body weight). This means if you weigh 150 pounds (68 kilograms), you should keep your protein consumption to around 40 grams per day.

Living with lupus nephritis? Avoid these foods (and eat these instead).

High Blood Pressure

Consuming less sodium is vital if you have high blood pressure — a condition that commonly accompanies lupus. The most notorious source of sodium is salt. The American Heart Association recommends no more than 2,300 milligrams of sodium per day. Just a half teaspoon of salt contains 1,150 milligrams of sodium — about half your limit for the entire day.

However, table salt isn’t the only source of sodium. Sodium comes from packaged foods (crackers, pretzels, and chips), beverages, frozen foods, natural foods (cheese, olives, and some seafood), and certain canned foods like legumes and vegetables. Takeout and restaurant foods are a common source of sodium as well. Limiting eating out, reading food labels, using spices instead of salt, and rinsing canned goods are important tips for keeping sodium consumption to a minimum.

Bone Health

Adequate calcium and vitamin D are important for bone health, especially for those experiencing kidney disease. Dietary calcium sources include dairy, fortified beverages like almond milk, and dark leafy green vegetables. Vitamin D assists with the absorption of calcium and is found in salmon, egg yolks, and fortified beverages. Our bodies also produce vitamin D from exposure to sunlight. Vitamin D deficiency has been associated with higher disease activity in people living with lupus.

Anemia

If you experience anemia, it is especially important to get adequate iron in your diet. Dietary sources of iron include beef, oysters, tofu, beans, nuts, and some vegetables. Consuming a source of vitamin C with dietary iron helps to increase absorption. A good pairing for this is a meal such as red peppers (vitamin C) stuffed with lean ground beef (iron).

Weight Management

Individuals with lupus may also be concerned about dietary recommendations for weight management. Steroids such as prednisone are often prescribed for specific conditions associated with lupus, and they may lead to weight gain, redistribution of fat stores, and overeating. Creating a calorie deficit with portion control and physical activity combined is the best and most efficient way to manage your weight.

5. Avoid Being Overly Restrictive

Living with lupus can feel complicated and overwhelming. Choosing the right foods to eat shouldn’t cause more confusion or stress. Following a Mediterranean diet is a research-proven way to decrease inflammation and promote a healthier, longer life — and even lose weight when combined with a calorie deficit.

Some diets like autoimmune protocol and paleo have been recommended for individuals with lupus. These may be more restrictive than necessary.

When evaluating claims about a diet, it is important to consider the source: Is the guidance written by a medical expert or a nutrition expert? Has the diet been studied in large samples and compared with other diets? Some foods may not be necessary to limit or introduce if there is no sound research on the matter. Furthermore, any exclusion of food groups may lead to nutritional deficiencies. Discuss any changes in diet with your physician or dietitian to ensure your health and safety.

The right healthy diet for you is one that you can stick to for a lifetime. It should be filled with foods that make your body feel energized and balanced. It shouldn’t cause you to sacrifice your social life. Keeping a food journal is an important tool for identifying any foods that may trigger inflammation (and therefore flare-ups). Working with your health care provider or registered dietitian is essential to ensure that your diet meets your needs.

Connect With Others Who Understand

MyLupusTeam is the social network for people with lupus and their loved ones. On MyLupusTeam, more than 214,000 members come together to ask questions, give advice, and share their stories with others who understand life with lupus.

Have you found that certain foods help your lupus or cause you to have a lupus flare? Share your experience in the comments below, or start a conversation by posting on your Activities page.

All updates must be accompanied by text or a picture.
Ariel D. Teitel, M.D., M.B.A. is the clinical associate professor of medicine at the NYU Langone Medical Center in New York. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Learn more about him here.
Kimberly McCloskey, R.D.N., L.D.N. is a Philadelphia-based registered and licensed dietitian who specializes in weight management and behavioral change. Learn more about her here.

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